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Convicts had to apply to the Government to obtain freedoms such as Tickets of Leave, Conditional Pardons and Free Pardons. They also had to apply for their Certificate of Freedom once they were free by servitude. Tickets of Leave could be revoked for misbehaviour.

The letter below from the the Colonial Secretary to the Police Magistrate at Launceston details the cost to convicts for obtaining their Certificate of Freedom (source: Manuscript 3251).

Police Magistrate

Launceston

Colonial Secretary's Office

10 December 1846

 

Sir,

I have the honor to inform you that His Excellency has decided that the course formerly pursued in issuing Deeds of Pardon to convicts entitled them, shall in all future applications be reverted to viz that the personal description of the convict, and the fee of 3/6 for registering the Pardon shall be forwarded by the Police Magistrate of each District before any Deed of Pardon will be issued but instead of being transmitted, as formerly, to the office of the registrar of the Convict Department they must be sent to this office from which the pardons issue.

I have also to inform you that in cases where the holder of a Deed of Pardon applies for a pardon with extended conditions, a fee of 2/6 is to be demanded, and also forwarded to this office with the Deed in questions.—

I have the honor to be

Sir

Your obedient servant

J.E. Bicheno

 

10 Dec 1846

5/6 to be forwarded ... applications of C.P. & 2/6 for extended documents

 

Ticket of Leave Revoked

Tickets of Leave could be revoked (or not granted) for any breaches of the convict laws, including absconding, being absent from muster or, for women, being pregnant. The following article appeared in the Launceston Examiner on Saturday 19 March 1842 (p.8).

PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT'S DEPARTMENT. March 10th, 1842. The Ticket-of-Leave granted to Catherine Fawles, per Hector, has been cancelled by order of the Lieutenant-Governor; His Excellency considering her unworthy of the indulgence, in consequence of her having been sent to the Female House of Correction in a state of illegitimate pregnancy.

...

The promises of Ticket-of-Leave given to the under-mentioned convicts have been cancelled by order of the Lieutenant-Governor; His Excellency considering them unworthy of the indulgence in consequence of their having been sent to the Female House of Correction in a state of illegitimate pregnancy:—Anne Armstrong, Newgrove. Jane Skinner, ditto. Jane Owen, ditto.